Relacing PRO-T Trapeze web

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Relacing PRO-T Trapeze web

Postby Cusser » October 22nd, 2008, 3:35 pm

My kid broke her PRO-T Trapeze web last night before a scrimmage with a community college, patched it for her use last night. So it looks like I'll be doing a relace job on it before this weekend's tournament. Does anyone have any specific instructions for a Trapeze web, or know how long (in advance) the leather lacing pieces should be? I do have other Trapeze gloves to use as a template if needed. I'm assuming that one first does the circular looping around the fingers, then does the two support laces the weave back and forth afterwards?
Here is a photo of my Kenny-restored TG-12 for reference (and I also have never-repaired PRO24 and PRO12TC)
[img]http://img9.uploadhouse.com/fileuploads/1812/18129408097d5d7e08610d3fd13b44ff120eaba.jpg[/img]
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Postby wjr953 » October 22nd, 2008, 5:23 pm

Well, I've never re-laced a Trap-eze before, but I wouldn't start any run with less than 72" of rawhide, especially if I didn't know how much I needed. As for the rest, the same formula applies, i.e. re-lace as you remove. I know that there are others on the forum that have re-laced Traps, so I'll leave the rest of the advice up to those guys with personal experience.

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Postby robin_buckeye » October 22nd, 2008, 5:55 pm

I've relaced quite a few different sytle gloves (including a couple traps) and never had a serious problem -- IF -- I relaced as I removed the old laces. I've relaced a couple that had laces removed or so tattered and broken that it was hard to figure out where things were going and it can be very confusing - so I'd recommend following that old lace!
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Postby Cusser » October 22nd, 2008, 6:28 pm

Well, relace as you remove seems like a common theme, a good idea (and one I actually WOULDN'T have thought of). I'll need to see what lengths I have at home, may only have 36 inch lengths. I should be able to start-in tonight as I catch the last 2/3 of the World Series game.
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Postby JC » October 22nd, 2008, 6:49 pm

I have relaced a couple of Pro-T webs.
You definitely need to use 72" lengths of lace.
Take your time, and be very conscious of the tension/slack in the zig-zag ("back and forth")lacing. You need to make sure to keep the spacing the same on both sides of the web. This is necessary to keep the Trap-eze web centered.
I laced mine a little looser at the top, and tighter at the base of the web. This gives you a wider web at the top.
I suggest that you lace the "perimeter" first, then do the "zig-zag" last.
Have fun!!
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Postby BretMan » October 22nd, 2008, 9:42 pm

Doing the "spiral/perimeter" lace along the edge of the forefinger, web/"sixth finger" and thumb first works well for me, too.

If you search around and find some pictures of Trap-Eze webs, you will see that on older gloves this "spiral" was one long continuous lace, starting at the top of the forefinger and running to the top of the thumb. I notice that on some newer gloves, instead of one long lace this is done with three short ones. (If you find the pictures, this will make more sense.)

It's good that you have other Trappers around to use as a reference- that was a tremendous help for me years ago when I relaced my first one. Acces to pictures of other gloves on the internet is always a big help, too. Other things I will do when working on an unfamiliar pattern is to take pictures with my digital camera before removing any laces, or make a rough sketch by hand.

Everything else, besides the web, is pretty straight forward on these gloves- just the same as any other glove. One area to take a close look at is the two laces that run across the top edge or the web/"sixth finger" and weave down along the sides of the trap. Take notice of the kind of tricky turn they take near the top of the web, as they turn to run down along the sides of the web. There is a spot at the top of the thumb and top of the forefinger where both of these laces run through the same "spiral/perimeter" lace, then separate to start the interwoven support lacing. Start off right in that area and the rest of the interwoven pattern will follow naturally.

I remember the first Trap-Eze I ever relaced gave me a few headaches and was a little bit frustrating. After doing a few, I pretty much had the pattern memorized and could relace one in my sleep!
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Postby Cusser » October 22nd, 2008, 11:21 pm

OK, I know some will "yell" at me, especially because it did turn out that I had two 72-inch pieces of good lacing, and a 42-inch piece. Taking a new look today, I decded that the repair job I did last night was pretty good, and the rest of the lacing also looked pretty good. So I decided to to with this, and do the complete re-lace at a more-opportune time. Yes, I know the repair lace section has "wrong" side showing (hey, it was pretty dark at the time, and I was in a hurry). Second photo shows repaired region in the red box. Please comment if you think I made OK decision to re-lace later, thanks.

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Postby BretMan » October 23rd, 2008, 2:55 pm

Looks like a good, servicable repair to get the glove back in action as quickly as possible. Sometimes, that is a practical approach- even if it does offend my picky glove colletor tastes!
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Postby wjr953 » October 23rd, 2008, 3:09 pm

Bret,
I couldn't agree with you more, but for a different reason. As you know I'm not a collector, I buy, fix and resell. Making gloves serviceable certainly is necessary in this case because of the time constraints that he had. However, it got me to thinking about all of the gloves that I've come across that have had the lacing blown out in one way or another and the means by which the owners made them "serviceable". Shoe laces, speaker wire, plastic zip ties, electrical tape, twist ties, the list goes on and on. I even had one glove that had staples in it, you know the industrial size ones used to seal shipping cartons shut. lol I know, I know, getting off topic here, sorry. Getting back to the original point of this post, the repair job may not be by the book, but it will get the job done for you until you have more time to mess around with it.

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Postby robin_buckeye » October 23rd, 2008, 3:19 pm

I'm sure some won't agree, but one has to think about "working" gloves versus "display" gloves.

Someday your daughter may be finished playing with it and she may want it "prettied up" and made to look somewhat like it did when new.

For now though, she's using it often -- color coordination and visual aesthetics aren't that important. When I re-lace a glove during a game for a teammate I use whatever color and size lace I have and they don't say a word. Far as I know, no one has changed any of my lacing work just for color or thickness match.

On the other hand, when I relaced and repaired my Dad's glove from the 50's I did everything I could to match new parts with the old.
Last edited by robin_buckeye on October 27th, 2008, 2:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby glovin » October 27th, 2008, 2:43 pm

robin_buckeye wrote:I'm sure some won't agree, but one has to think about "working" gloves versus "display" gloves.

Someday your daughter may be finished playing with it and she may want it "prettied up" and made to look somewhat like it did when new.

For now though, she's using it often -- color coordination and visual aesthetics aren't that important. When I re-lace a glove during a game for a teammate I use whatever color and size lace I have and they don't say a word. Far as I know, no one has changed any of my lacing work just for color or thickness match.

On the other hand, when I relaced and repaired my Dad's glove form the 50's I did everything I could to match new parts with the old.


i completely agree...ppl have to understand that not every glove is meant to be put on a shelf and looked at...
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Postby Brotherray » October 28th, 2008, 2:01 am

Your relace job gives the glove added character. I wouldn't change a thing!
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Postby wickedwoman11 » October 28th, 2008, 10:33 am

I'm impressed. I have a TrapEze model that I put in new lacing everywhere in the glove but couldn't figure out how to do the web, so it still is sitting in a bag waiting for me to go back to. As far as I'm concerned, you can fix those laces later if you want them "perfect" but at least she can use the glove in the interim. That is more than I can say for my TrapEze one...
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