Some thoughts

Please share your knowledge on how to keep your vintage gloves in great shape and looking sharp.

Some thoughts

Postby softball66 » January 7th, 2008, 9:32 am

There have been some excellent posts here and I've learned some new techniques and methods for cleaning and conditioning etc.
I wanted to bring to the attention a problem that I knew I was going to encounter with my inexpensive yet near mint Ted Simmons Rawlings MJ50 (made in Korea) mitt.
I knew from the minute I spotted that light tan (light palomino color) that cleaning this dried out mitt would be a problem. Any moisturizer or cleaner you applied would streak and darken the mitt and sure enough using a little petrolatum carefully resulted in this happening. This leather is basically an open pore, open knap type leather and transforms darker or streaks when any oil or moisturizer hits it. This inexpensive leather dries quickly over the years and is the devil to clean and renew the leather.
Which brings me to a point about the use of vaseline. Now Nocona has used vaseline for more than a half century to hand last its gloves in the post production process. I've used it for 40 years to clean and condition gloves. I had quite a discussion with "Glove Affairs" Noah Lieberman over his section in his book about the negatives of using vaseline. He told me he had gotten gloves from Dick Stump that were over vaselined and this IS a PROBLEM. Too much vaseline is NOT GOOD. Especially as mentioned previously in this area if you're playing with the glove as it picks up dirt and dust. Noah also claimed he talked with a leather expert who claimed that vaseline crosslinked with the leather and clogged the pores. I simply have not found this to have been the case.
Lanolin IS EXCELLENT to use.
Neatsfoot I have been told over and over by many, DO NOT USE as it DOES clog the leather pores. AND I've seen disastrous overuse of Neatsfoot in its various forms. :roll:
softball66
Hall of Famer Glove Poster
 
Posts: 1638
Joined: April 18th, 2006, 11:20 pm

On Vaseline

Postby oldreliable » January 14th, 2008, 9:16 pm

I've used petroleum jelly on a few gloves, and one thing I've noticed is that in cold weather the glove is a little stiffer. It's like the difference between sticking your finger in the Vaseline jar when it's really hot out and when it's really cold out. The stuff is much stiffer when it's cold, and it seems to me that the stuff behaves the same when it's on or in leather.

Personally, I like stiff gloves.

I have never had any petroleum jelly gloves crack, but I always use mine.

Thanks,

John,
Ithaca, NY
User avatar
oldreliable
Veteran Glove Poster
 
Posts: 126
Joined: December 23rd, 2007, 11:54 pm
Location: Ithaca, NY

Postby BretMan » January 15th, 2008, 12:08 pm

Then again, isn't any glove stiffer in cold weather and more flexible when it's warm, regardless of how it's been treated?

One of the things that always puzzled me about Lieberman's thoughts against petroleum jelly is that he offers the argument that it is technically a "wax". Yet if you research lanolin, the substance that he recommends and raves about, it too is technically a wax!

I've used both over the years and didn't find any obvious negative effects from the petroleum jelly. The only reason I rarely use it anymore is that I personally like the results from lanolin so much better.
User avatar
BretMan
Hall of Famer Glove Poster
 
Posts: 886
Joined: May 17th, 2006, 9:27 pm
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Postby ebbets55 » January 22nd, 2008, 12:34 pm

I haven't cleaned a glove in so long. Anyway, I used to love to clean and condition gloves. TGC once told me to never put anything on a glove that you wouldn't put on your own skin. Great advice. Vaseline and lanolin are both great conditioners in my opinion but I never use lanolin. I have gloves that were conditioned in the mid 90's with Vaseline and they are still beautiful today. They might require a light second coat years later but I love that ever so moist & slightly tacky feel. I personally like Vaseline the best as I have seen first hand the results of its use after 10+ years. I have just about every conditioner on the market and have always loved Dr. Jackson's as well. Love the smell but nine times out of ten, I'm using Vaseline if it's the right type of leather.

JD
User avatar
ebbets55
Hall of Famer Glove Poster
 
Posts: 741
Joined: August 8th, 2006, 5:14 pm
Location: So-Cal

Postby docglov » January 22nd, 2008, 12:56 pm

[ All good idea's men but anything that does not soak in is in the long run going to hold dirt and be bad for the leather. Thats ok if it only goes on the shelf to look at but a heavy user won't be happy. In my 30+ years of glove making I have tried it all and there is a draw back to everything we use. Have had pretty good results with lexol products they do stain a little and seem to disappear farily quick but They don't seem to attract and hold dirt or grime. The best is of course is useing the oil that they tan the leather with but its not on the market yet. Rawlings is hopeing to market it later in thier new easbay line of 100% made in USA HOH gloves which will be out probably in Feb.
docglov
Gold Glove Poster
 
Posts: 285
Joined: January 9th, 2008, 10:15 am

Re: Some thoughts

Postby madhatter » December 15th, 2011, 11:17 am

The problem with conditioning with petroleum jelly is the petroleum. Petroleum based oils are cheaper but will work as solvents over the long run leaching out more of the natural oils in the leather then they replace. Lexol is just as bad for the same reason.

100% pure neetsfoot oil is good for leather but soft pliable leathers like bgloves are made from are too easy to over do the neetsfoot oil and will give a muddy result and break down the old leather.

There are some very good, animal based conditioners on the market and IMHO, Tenderly is the best for all leathers especially the type of leathers that gloves are made from. It will temporarily darken light leathers but as it soaks further into the skin it will return to the natural color.
madhatter
Rookie Glove Poster
 
Posts: 4
Joined: December 11th, 2011, 4:01 pm


Return to Glove Conditioning and Restoration

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests